Clearing out the Engine Bay

Today I spent some time removing the remaining components from the engine bay. This included the hydraulic components (master cylinders and hard lines) and some other miscellaneous bits and pieces. Here is a picture of the engine bay before I began:

The first thing I did was to remove the hood pins. These are not original, so I am going to try to repair the car to the point at which one cannot tell they were ever there. The pins were threaded and bolted in on the top and the bottom.

I loosened the lower bolt using a 3/4″ wrench and socket, and out it came. XXX is a nice dent and hole where the pins were located that will need to be repaired.

On the driver’s side of the firewall were the brake and clutch master cylinders. On the passenger’s side was the brake junction box that contains the switch for the “S-Brake” light in the car.

I started with the clutch master cylinder. I loosened and removed the clutch line fitting on the side of the cylinder using a 7/16″ wrench.

There was a clamp securing all of the hard lines onto the middle of the firewall that I removed in order to free up the lines.

Then I was able to remove the clutch line, which terminated at a bracket on the body on the lower passenger side, where the soft line attached to it previously.

I loosened the bracketed that held the clutch master reservoir in place using a 10 mm wratcheting wrench and then popped the plastic reservoir right off. My clutch master must have been replaced recently by the previous owner because it is in very good shape.

The master was bolted to the firewall from the inside; I loosened and removed the two nuts on the outside using a 1/2″ wrench (top) and a 1/2″ socket on an extension (bottom).

Then I was able to pull the clutch master cylinder through the firewall and out of the engine bay. Because I intend to re-use this master cylinder, I took wiped it down and cleaned it up and took it inside.

I cleaned up the parts using alcohol and wiped them dry with clean paper towels. If I keep the cylinder clean and dry it should not deteriorate while in temporary storage.

Then I turned my attention to the brake master cylinder. It has two reservoirs, and two similar hard lines mounted to the bottom of each. I loosened and removed these lines using a 7/16″ wrench.

Likewise I loosened the bolt on the reservoir clamps, then removed the reservoirs, and removed the nut from the top bolt that mounted the cylinder to the firewall using a 1/2″ wrench.

I had to use a fully rotating wratcheting wrench (1/2″) to be able to access the lower mounting nut. It was a very tight fit making it impossible to get a conventional wrench or a socket with an extension in there. So I held that nut with the flexible wrench and turned the 1/2″ bolt from the other side of the firewall to get it loose.

With that bolt loose the brake master was free from the firewall.

Then I pulled the brake master cylinder out. I plan to replace this piece because it is clearly old and may not be in the best condition, considering the brakes were non-functioning when I got the car.

Both hard brake lines from the master cylinder led into the bottom of a junction box on the passenger side of the firewall. This box also contains the switch for the “S-brake” light in the car. That light is supposed to come on when/if you lose pressure in the braking system. Out of the junction box emerge two more hard lines that feed the right and left left front brakes. The line out of the top of the box supplies the driver’s side and the line out of the side of the box supplies the passenger side. I loosened the box’s mounting bolt using a 1/2″ socket and removed the box.

I left all of the brake lines attached.

I removed the remaining fuel supply line, which had previously run from the fuel pump to the carburetors.

There was an oil line that connected to the oil pressure gauge inside the car. I pulled this outward into the engine bay and had to twist it around to navigate all of its bends through the hole in the firewall.

After popping the rubber firewall grommet off I pulled the end of the line through the firewall.

Then there were two metal brackets that the throttle arm and cable had connected to. I removed these using a Phillips head screwdriver.

From under the upper edge of the hood I unscrewed the four mounting screws and removed the VIN tag.

I also pulled off the sticker that indicates the paint color.

Inside underneath the firewall were the air/heat vents on either side. I removed the flaps that open and close these vents. Each flap pivoted on a post. In order to get the posts free I bent the metal tab holding them in place on the firewall side mounting hole.

Then I was able to slide that end of the post down and away and pull the other end of the post out of its hole.

Here is one flap after I removed it from the vent.

Next I removed the hood hinges, each of which was mounted in place by a bolt through the bottom. I used a 7/16″ socket and wrench.

Then I removed the hood prop from the driver’s side front edge of the engine bay. I straightened and removed the cotter pin holding it in place.

That completed the clearing of the engine bay.

Here are the two halves; the once and future homes of the master cylinders and junction box.

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